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Contact

Contact with chambers should be made through the Practice Management Team. They are happy to discuss client requirements and provide further information on such matters as the expertise and experience of individual members, fees, working practices and languages spoken. We have members able to work in French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, Swedish, Greek and Chinese (Mandarin).

Outside working hours, a member of our team is always available to be contacted on matters of an urgent nature. Contact should be made using the Chambers main number or email.

To contact our Singapore office, please contact our BD Director, Asia, Rachel Foxton. Out of office hours calls will automatically be diverted to our clerking team in London.

London

20 Essex Street
London
WC2R 3AL

enquiries@twentyessex.com
t: +44 20 7842 1200
DX 0009 Lond/Chan Lane

Singapore

28 Maxwell Road
#02-03
Maxwell Chambers Suites
Singapore 069120

singapore@twentyessex.com
t: +65 62257230

Contact

Contact with chambers should be made through the Practice Management Team. They are happy to discuss client requirements and provide further information on such matters as the expertise and experience of individual members, fees, working practices and languages spoken. We have members able to work in French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, Swedish, Greek and Chinese (Mandarin).

Outside working hours, a member of our team is always available to be contacted on matters of an urgent nature. Contact should be made using the Chambers main number or email.

To contact our Singapore office, please contact our BD Director, Asia, Rachel Foxton. Out of office hours calls will automatically be diverted to our clerking team in London.

London

20 Essex Street
London
WC2R 3AL

enquiries@twentyessex.com
t: +44 20 7842 1200
DX 0009 Lond/Chan Lane

Singapore

28 Maxwell Road
#02-03
Maxwell Chambers Suites
Singapore 069120

singapore@twentyessex.com
t: +65 62257230

08/12/2015

London International Boundary Delimitation Conference

This is an archived article, and some links may not work. Contact us if you have any questions.

Last week, members of Chambers Penelope Nevill and Monica Feria-Tinta attended the London International Boundary Delimitation Conference.  

Whilst Penelope Nevill gave a paper on Ethics and International Boundaries, Monica Feria-Tinta participated in workshops addressing Maritime Boundary Delimitation, and Mineral resource beyond oil and gas and their significance for coastal states’ maritime boundaries, working alongside State delegations of Korea, Indonesia, and Timor-Leste.  Principles such as maritime zones, equidistance lines, equitable boundaries, special circumstances, and proportionality, were thoroughly applied in such context.

The Conference, attended by over 150 delegates including diplomats and governmental officials, opened with a keynote by Prof. Tullio Treves, a former judge of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea.

Over three days, issues such as Island sovereignty and maritime jurisdiction, Jurisdictional challenges in boundary and sovereignty disputes among others, were explored.   Topics such as the recent arbitration case between Philippines v China, under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), currently pending before the Permanent Court of Arbitration, were discussed. On October 29, 2015, the Permanent Court of Arbitration ruled that it has jurisdiction over the case.

Maritime Boundary Delimitation or “measuring the sea” (and its interface with jurisdiction over natural resources in the sea), is at the cutting edge of Public International Law featuring as a recurrent topic in the jurisprudence of the International Court of Justice and arbitral proceedings.   The search for natural resources has turned the eyes to the sea, making the demarcation of sovereign maritime territory of importance for States.   In recent years many of such disputes relating to maritime boundary delimitation has concerned Latin American States including Peru, Chile, Nicaragua, Colombia and Honduras, as well as countries in Asia such as Bangladesh, India, and Myanmar.  


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